gesunheitpfleges.org



Harbor BioSciences announces publication of newly discovered anti-inflammatory steroids

November 28, 2015

* Mice treated with the CRTIGPSVC-targeted versions loaded with the HSVtk gene had tumors that were typically half the size of those in mice treated with the untargeted delivery system when both groups were treated with ganciclovir.

* Blood vessel and glioma cells forced to commit suicide (apoptosis) were found throughout the tumors of mice treated with the peptide-targeted delivery system. Cell suicide did not occur above background levels in normal brain tissue.

* PET/CT scans showed widespread targeting of tumor tissue with little or no signal in normal tissue.

The team analyzed expression of the transferrin receptor in 165 samples of human tumors. A strong or moderate presence of the receptor was found on 85 percent of glioblastoma samples, indicating that the receptor might be a suitable target for human use.

Beyond cancer: Genetic defects, neurodegenerative diseases

Peptide-guided delivery of drugs or imaging agents could apply to other diseases of the central nervous system, said co-author Richard Sidman, M.D., emeritus professor of neuropathology at Harvard Medical School and the Department of Neurology at Beth Deaconess Medical Center.

"One important set of diseases to test will be lysosomal storage diseases, mostly lethal in childhood or adolescence, in each of which a different crucial brain enzyme is markedly reduced or absent because of a defect in the corresponding gene," Sidman said. "These diseases can be treated by provision to the brain of 25 percent or less of the missing enzyme. Therefore, the prospect merits testing as to whether delivery of even modest amounts of the normal version of the pertinent gene across the blood-brain barrier would be therapeutically effective."

Prospects for radiologically diagnosing and treating strokes, traumatic injury and neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases, also are worth pursuing, Sidman noted.

An accompanying commentary in JCI notes the flexibility and utility of the researchers' plan of attack. "We can look forward to future applications of this approach for the discovery of new druggable targets and the identification of cell surface molecules that may be important in many types of cancer as well as other diseases," concluded co-authors David Nathanson, M.D., and Paul Mischel, M.D., of the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.

Source MD Anderson