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Majority of nurses are unaware of simple diagnostic test for sepsis

October 10, 2015

"We have the tools at hand to dramatically improve the speed of diagnosis and reduce the extremely high fatality rate of sepsis in the U.S.," said Dr. Devendra N. Amin, MD, FCCP, medical director of Critical Care Services at Morton Plant Hospital in Clearwater.  "PCT is one of those tools. It's not a panacea, but it can save lives." Dr. Amin was one of the first critical care physicians in the U.S. to incorporate PCT into his hospital's sepsis response protocol and has seen a dramatic improvement in outcomes.

This survey of critical care nurses is part of bioMerieux's overarching effort to raise awareness of sepsis and best-in-class protocols to treat the acute condition, and comes on the heels of another survey on sepsis released by The Feinstein Institute for Medical Research at the North Shore-LIJ Health System showing that 60 percent of adults have never even heard of sepsis, even though it is the cause of death for 1 out of every 4 hospital fatalities.

Sepsis is an inflammatory response to an infection and can be difficult to diagnose because of overlapping symptoms, such as elevated heart rate, rapid breathing and fever. As many as 750,000 people in the U.S. are diagnosed with severe sepsis each year, and 200,000 of these patients do not survive.

SOURCE bioMerieux