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NCI awards Case Western Reserve with $1.6 million grant for cancer research

March 05, 2016

Researchers will work to leverage the immune system's unique ability to generate immune memory to eradicate any future cancer cell development that is derived from a primary tumor, according to Dr. Huang. They will use an advanced imaging technique called intravital 2-photon laser scanning microscopy to directly visualize tumor and immune cell interactions in real-time.

Dr. Huang's laboratory has been at the forefront of developing this imaging technology, which he says provides a "court-side" view of how tumors and the immune system interact with one another within intact tissue as cancer spreads to the lymph nodes. The technology is designed to provide a powerful in vivo experimental platform to monitor future anti-cancer or immunotherapy approaches, as opposed to static tissue analysis or single-cell analysis on a plastic petri dish, he explains.

Dr. Huang's research is among the first attempts to directly visualize the tolerance of immune cells by metastatic cancer cells in the draining lymph node at a cellar level, in a dynamic fashion.

As a practicing pediatric hematologist and oncologist, Dr. Huang aims to one day be able to apply the scientific insight gained from this research in a pediatric care setting.

Source: Case Western Reserve University