gesunheitpfleges.org



Smoking can increase pain severity in cancer patients

October 09, 2015

In this cross-sectional study, investigators surveyed 224 patients with a range of cancer diagnoses. Patients completed self-report measures of pain severity, pain-related distress, and pain-related interference, as well as a demographics questionnaire. Patients were asked to rate their perceived severity of bodily pain (1 = ''none" to 6 = ''very severe") and the degree to which pain interfered with their daily routine (1 = ''not at all" to 5 = ''extremely"). Current smokers experienced more severe pain than never smokers, and also reported more interference from pain than either never smokers or former smokers. Among former smokers, there was an inverse relation between pain and the number of years since quitting, suggesting that quitting smoking may reduce pain over time.

"Clinicians must do more to assist cancer patients to quit smoking after their diagnosis," according to Lori Bastian, MD, Durham VA Medical Center and Department of Internal Medicine, Duke University, writing in an accompanying commentary. While pointing out the complexities inherent in studies of the relationships among pain, cancer diagnoses, and nicotine addiction, she observed that "The major strength of this study is the diverse types of cancer and stage of disease." She continues, "Although more research is needed to understand the mechanisms that relate nicotine to pain, physicians should aggressively promote smoking cessation among cancer patients. Preliminary findings suggest that smoking cessation will improve the overall treatment response and quality of life."

Source: Texas A&M University